Dr. Navina Hooker
English 102

English 102
is a continuation of English 101, with further study of the resources of the language through a critical analysis of imaginative forms of writing. Emphasis will be placed upon well-organized written composition, factually supported conclusions, and awareness of language variety. Effectiveness of expression and validity of judgement in the student's writing are stressed.Genre reading will include fiction, poetry, and drama. Credit may not be received for both this course and English 103.

Prerequisite: English 101 with a grade of C or better.


Course objectives
1. To recognize the elements of structure in short fiction, drama, and poetry.
2. To improve the student's writing and analytical skills.
3. To familiarize the student with important ideas as they are expressed through literary forms.
4. To understand the techniques used by individual authors. With each successive work, the student should become increasingly aware of each author's handling of such elements as plot, character, point of view, and so on.
5. To learn a language appropriate to critical analysis. Jargon for its own sake is to be avoided, but specific terms common in the analysis of each genre should become a part of each student's vocabulary.
6. To learn to evaluate a work by its literary and historical context.
7. To develop an appreciation for the aesthetic dimension of art.
8. To understand different cultures and cultural experiences through the study of literature from non-Western societies.

Required texts
The textbook for this course is Literature: An Introduction to Reading and Writing by E. Roberts and H. Jacobs. A good dictionary is also required.

Course Content
A. Short Fiction
1. Overview and precis: O'Brien, Walker, Williams
2. Plot and structure: Crane, Welty, Whitecloud
3. Character: Cather, Faulkner , Glaspell, Tan
4. Point of view: Bierce, Jackson, Mansfield, Moore, Olsen, Updike
5. Setting: Chopin, Greenberg, Ozick, Poe
6. Tone: Atwood, Hemingway, Hodgkins, Munro, O'Connor
7. Symbolism and Allegory: Aesop, Hawthorne, St.Luke, Poe, Steinbeck, Tremblay

Not all of the works cited will be discussed specifically in class, but students should have them all read by the assigned class and are responsible for them. There will be two short essays (3 pages each) on the topics above.

B. Drama
1. Overview and types of drama: Glaspell, Hughes, Keller, O'Neill
2. Tragedy: Sophocles, Shakespeare
3. Comedy: Shakespeare, Chekhov, Henley

We will expect to spend about a week discussing the first group of plays, and a week on each of the following plays. Because of the longer length of the Shakespearean plays, the student would benefit from allocating more time to read these works. We will, if time permits, be seeing videotapes of one or more plays in class. There will be two written assignments (3 pages each) on topics relating to drama such as structure (exposition, complication, climax, denouement), setting, characterization (protagonist, antagonist), action, theme, and tone.

C. Poetry
1. Overview, the nature of poetry, paraphrasing poetry
2. Diction
3. Imagery
4. Rhetorical figures (metaphor, simile, apostrophe, personification, hyperbole)
5. Tone
6. Rhythm and sound devices (alliteration, assonance, rhyme patterns)


There will be two written assignments (3 pages each) on these elements of poetry. Students might be asked to discuss a poem of their choice in class with regard to the above topics which would then form a part of their final grade under the category of class participation.

Course requirements
This course is largely discussion-based and good class attendance is therefore essential. Excessive absences (more than 1 or 2 absences without a doctor's note) will count against the student in his or her mark for class participation. The essays assigned should be completed promptly. We will dedicate class time to first drafts of written assignments which will impact on the final grade of each assignment. If the student foresees a reason for a late paper, an extension can be granted provided the student has discussed this with me prior to the due date. In addition to the essays mentioned above, there will be   mid-term exam and a longer written assignment toward the end of term. This last will be about 6 pages in length and will address works from different genres in a comparison/contrast exercise. There will be a final exam covering all the material above.

Determination of final grades
Final grades will be determined in the following manner:
Short essays 50%
Long essay 20%
Class participation 10%
Final exam 20%

Page last reviewed 04/17/01