Dr. Navina Hooker
English 101
Course objectives
The course will emphasize the different stages of the writing process
that comprise the complete activity of essay writing: activities to aid the process of invention, materials from a variety of sources to stimulate ideas for subjects; readings of professional and student writings to
provide models of form; collaborative activities to aid in drafting and
critical reading of one's own work; handbook exercises in points of grammar and approaches to editing; strategies for significant revision of written work.


Writing objectives

1. The ability to write formal papers using various rhetorical techniques characterized by the following:

a. An introduction with a thesis statement.
b. A body comprised of substantial paragraphs with recognizable topic sentences that clearly support and develop the thesis.
c. Transitional elements which connect paragraphs and sentences.
d. A use of language which is accurate and creates a tone appropriate to the subject.
e. Standard grammatical form.
f. A level of thought suited to the overall aim and audience.

2. The ability to use research techniques and materials and to use the library effectively.

3. The ability to review one's own work critically and objectively.

Reading and discussion objectives
1. The ability to recognize the author's aim and the majot rhetorical forms used to develop the essays.
2. The ability to recognize the various components of essays and to relate them to theme.
3. The ability to analyze the assumptions, values, and abilities of selected essayists.
4. The ability to recognize various types and levels of language. a. Symbolic, ironic, satiric, figurative. b. Slang, jargon, euphemism. c. Slanted-prejudicial, manipulative.
5. The ability to recognize logical reasoning. a. Inductive and deductive reasoning. b. Fallacies, propaganda. c. Argument by authority, statistics, analogy, illustration, and so forth.
6. The ability to evaluate the effectiveness of selected student themes.

Required texts
1. Jean Wyrick  and Beverly Slaughter, The Rinehart Reader, Harcourt Brace.
2. Jane Aaron, The Little, Brown Compact Handbook, Longman.

Course requirements
The class will be assigned a number of formal and informal papers of varying length, handbook exercises, tests, a mid-term and a final exam. Because much of the course will involve in-class writing and peer review workshops, good class attendance and participation is essential. Excessive absences (more than 3 without a doctor's excuse) will directly affect the student's final grade. The writing assignments for this class include analyzing reactions to readings, incorporating information from readings to support a thesis, and a researched paper requiring supplementary references to support a position. Additional in-class writing will also be assigned to asses your understanding of readings. All papers must be typed (double-spaced) and each paper must be about 3-4 pages in length. Prompt completion of all assignments is exigent. Extensions can be granted only if the student discusses the situation with me prior to the due date.

Determination of final grades
Papers 50%
Mid-term 20%
Class participation and attendance 10%
Final exam 20%

Required readings
1. Defining this course: Wright, Malcolm X., Elbow, Baker, Zinsser, Murray.
2. Narration and description: Hughes, Angelou, Gansberg, White.
3. Definition and illustration: Ciardi, Chase, Rodriguez, Staples, Walker, Morrow, Tuchman.
4. Process and classification: Quinn, Milford, King, Gordon, Viorst, Thomas, Baker, Updike.
5. Comparison and contrast: Twain, Catton, Britt, Lopez, Shakespeare.
6. Cause and effect: Goodman, Forster, Tuchman.
7. Argument: King, Carson, Brady, Vidal, Stanton, Rodriguez, Swift, Marvell.

We may study further readings in the text if time allows.

Page last reviewed 04/17/01