SCI 100

 

 

Introductory Seminar

For

Liberal Arts and Science -

Science Majors

 

The assignments and tasks for this course are listed below. Your instructor will determine the dates that these are due. Your instructor may change the point system depending on the semester and type of projects the class is working on. You may keep track of your progress on this page.

    Pts             Letter Grade

1000-930               A

929-900                 A-

899-870                 B+

869-840                 B

839-800                 B-

799-750                 C+

749-700                 C

699-600                 D

599-0                     F

Date Due

Points

Activity

 

 

  • Graduation Plan

 

 

  • Semester Plan

 

 

  • Gathering the Facts

 

 

  • Transfer Week Sheet

 

 

  • Transfer Worksheet

 

 

  • Scientific Method Laboratory

 

 

  • Quantitative Hypotheses

 

 

  • Scientific Method, Inductive and Deductive Reasoning Quiz

 

 

  • Library Research Assignment

 

 

  • Library Bibliography

 

 

  • Exploring the Net

 

 

  • Internet Bibliography

 

 

  • Journal Review

 

 

  • Article abstracts

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Introduction

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Materials and Methods

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Results

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Discussion

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Conclusion

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Abstract

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Bibliography

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Presentation

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Evaluation - yours

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Evaluation - others

 

 

  • Laboratory Report Evaluation Quiz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course

Semester planed

Completion

Credits

Liberal Arts Courses

 

 

 

ENG 101 Composition I

 

 

3

ENG 102 Composition I I

 

 

3

BHS 103 Social Problems

 

 

3

HIS 104 American History or

HIS 108 World History or

HIS 121 American Government

Indicate 1st, 2nd and 3rd choices

 

 

3

WFE 101 Wellness and Fitness

 

 

3

Any Humanities course- pick one

 

 

3

Any Social Science course

PSY 111 Recommended

 

 

3

Free elective- any course- pick one

 

 

3-4

Science and related courses

 

 

 

SCI 100

 

 

1

BIO 101 General Biology I

 

 

4

BIO 102 General Biology II

 

 

4

BIO 2__

 

 

4

BIO 2__

 

 

4

CHE 121 General Chemistry I

 

 

4

CHE 122 General Chemistry II

 

 

4

CHE 221 Organic Chemistry I

 

 

4

CHE 222 Organic Chemistry II

 

 

4

MAT 115 or Pre-Calculus

MAT 221 Calculus I

 

 

4

Elective

 

 

2-4

Totals 64 credits required

 

 

 

Courses not applicable to the degree- may not be required

 

 

 

ENG 091

 

 

3 equivalents

MAT 091 or

MAT 100 or

MAT 110

 

 

3 equivalents

3

3

CHE 111

 

 

4

 

First Semester

 

                      Course

Credits

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

Semester Totals

 

Second Semester

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

Semester Totals

 

Third Semester

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

Semester Totals

 

Fourth Semester

 

1

 

2

 

3

 

4

 

5

 

6

 

Semester Totals

 

Summer School

 

1

 

2

 

Summer School

 

1

 

2

 

Summer Totals

 

Grand Total - 64 needed for graduation

 

 

 

Gathering the Facts

Following the format below, research three jobs in a library, career center, or with a person who has the job you are interested in. The jobs may be from different fields (e.g., physical therapist, immunology research, corporate environmental impact officer) or similar jobs in the same field (e.g., cell culture technician, laboratory supervisor, Ph.D. in charge of research program). Make the third job one you would consider if you could not have the first two for some unknown reason. This would be a fallback position that may end up being the job that is great for you.

Once you identify some job titles of interest to you, gather the following information.

Career One

  1. Title of career_____________________________________________________
  2. Salary range______________________________________________________
  3. Hours___________________________________________________________
  4. Benefits__________________________________________________________
  5. Outlook (will there be jobs in the future?) ________________________________
  6. _________________________________________________________________

  7. Educational requirements - Minimum training necessary____________________
  8. Additional education________________________________________________

  9. Colleges or Universities offering the training
  1. ______________________________________________________________
  2. ______________________________________________________________
  3. ______________________________________________________________
  1. Personal requirements______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  2. Physical demands__________________________________________________
  3. Work description___________________________________________________
  4. Working conditions_________________________________________________
  5. Opportunities for advancement________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  6. Related occupations________________________________________________

Gathering the Facts

Following the format below, research three jobs in a library, career center, or with a person who has the job you are interested in. The jobs may be from different fields (e.g., physical therapist, immunology research, corporate environmental impact officer) or similar jobs in the same field (e.g., cell culture technician, laboratory supervisor, Ph.D. in charge of research program). Make the third job one you would consider if you could not have the first two for some unknown reason. This would be a fallback position that may end up being the job that is great for you.

Once you identify some job titles of interest to you, gather the following information.

Career Two

  1. Title of career_____________________________________________________
  2. Salary range______________________________________________________
  3. Hours___________________________________________________________
  4. Benefits__________________________________________________________
  5. Outlook (will there be jobs in the future?) ________________________________
  6. _________________________________________________________________

  7. Educational requirements - Minimum training necessary____________________
  8. Additional education________________________________________________

  9. Colleges or Universities offering the training
  1. ______________________________________________________________
  2. ______________________________________________________________
  3. ______________________________________________________________
  1. Personal requirements______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  2. Physical demands__________________________________________________
  3. Work description___________________________________________________
  4. Working conditions_________________________________________________
  5. Opportunities for advancement________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  6. Related occupations________________________________________________

Gathering the Facts

Following the format below, research three jobs in a library, career center, or with a person who has the job you are interested in. The jobs may be from different fields (e.g., physical therapist, immunology research, corporate environmental impact officer) or similar jobs in the same field (e.g., cell culture technician, laboratory supervisor, Ph.D. in charge of research program). Make the third job one you would consider if you could not have the first two for some unknown reason. This would be a fallback position that may end up being the job that is great for you.

Once you identify some job titles of interest to you, gather the following information.

Career Three

  1. Title of career_____________________________________________________
  2. Salary range______________________________________________________
  3. Hours___________________________________________________________
  4. Benefits__________________________________________________________
  5. Outlook (will there be jobs in the future?) ________________________________
  6. _________________________________________________________________

  7. Educational requirements - Minimum training necessary____________________
  8. Additional education________________________________________________

  9. Colleges or Universities offering the training
  1. ______________________________________________________________
  2. ______________________________________________________________
  3. ______________________________________________________________
  1. Personal requirements______________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  2. Physical demands__________________________________________________
  3. Work description___________________________________________________
  4. Working conditions_________________________________________________
  5. Opportunities for advancement________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________
  6. Related occupations________________________________________________

 

SCI 100 Transfer Work Sheet

Please fill in the blanks with your preferences.

Major field of interest________________________________________________

Secondary field of interest___________________________________________

Other interests____________________________________________________

Geographical considerations_____________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

College size___________________________________________________

Co-ed, unisex, public, private, religious, military, Ivy League, technical, etc.? ________________________________________________________________

Financial considerations_____________________________________________

College or University

Majors

Location

Other Information

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SCI 100 Intro to Exploring the Net

Please fill the blanks for the following questions using the Internet for your information. If you have not done this before, please see me now.

  1. Start on the Dutchess Community College homepage.
  2. A The URL is ________________________________________________

    B What hours are the library open this week? _______________________

    C What is the name of our Academic Dean? ________________________

    D Copy the course description for BIO 210 ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    E E-mail a message to me at fowler@sunydutchess.edu

  3. What does the National Institute of Health have on its homepage this week?
  4. ___________________________________________________________

    The URL is _________________________________________________

  5. What is the current weather in Denver, Colorado? ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
  6. URL where you found this information.

    ___________________________________________________________

  7. What is the current morbidity and mortality rate for syphilis? ___________________________________________________________
  8. URL where you found this information. ___________________________________________________________

  9. What is the course designation for freshman biology at the State University at Albany? ________________________________________________________
  10. URL where you found this information. ________________________________________________________

  11. Who is the New York State Animal Pathologist? ________________________________________________________
  12. URL where you found this information. ________________________________________________________

  13. What is Pfiesteria piscicida? ________________________________________________________
  14. URL where you found this information. ________________________________________________________

  15. Where could you find a job as a virologist? ________________________________________________________

          URL where you found this information.

          _________________________________________________________   

     9. What is the lead article in Science News this week?

         _________________________________________________________

         URL where you found this information.

         _________________________________________________________

   10. Choose some colleges or universities and visit Biology Department WebPages until

          you find one with more than a list of faculty and their curriculum vitae. What did you find, and

          would it help you if you were a student at that institution?

          __________________________________________________________

          ___________________________________________________________

          ___________________________________________________________

          URL where you found this information.

           ___________________________________________________________

Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

You have learned that science is a logical method of considering reality. Since we deal with reality all of our waking lives, science is important as a means of ordering and making more logical our reactions to our environment.

The basic method of science is generalization, or induction. This is the process of drawing inferences about a whole class from a few of its members or making a generalization by tying together various related facts.

When a botanist describes a new plant, he may be primarily interested not in the properties of the individual specimens he observed, but in those properties he has reason to believe are shared by all other specimens of the same species. Thus a brown spot on one plant but not on the others would not be considered significant, but the color of the petals and the shapes of the flowers and leaves would be used to make up a generalized description of all plants of that species.

A composite of a particular length of dress, a particular line, and a particular collar might together describe a new style in women's clothing. To describe a fabric or a button would not be adequate to bring to mind a certain made of dress, but the combination of several pertinent characteristics would serve as a general description.

The method of reasoning that builds facts into a generalization is called induction or inductive reasoning.

Deduction, on the other hand, proceeds from a known generalization and allows the prediction of some hitherto unknown facts or events. Deduction requires that a generalization has already been established. Knowing that flowers are characteristically found on all plants which have true roots, stems, and leaves, and bear covered seeds, would lead us to predict that a newly discovered plant with those characteristics would also have flowers-even if none are visible on the specimens shown to us. We have deduced that these plants must have flowers.

Sherlock Holmes, the great fictional detective, was always able to get his man by predicting the villain's actions on the basis of his huge store of "laws of human behavior," which were nothing more than generalizations about the way people behave.

Ordinarily it is not possible to examine every member of a large group of objects or ideas. You cannot examine every suit in the store, every corpuscle in the body, or every insect with sucking mouthparts. Consequently, induction is ordinarily based on a part of the class membership. This leads to the problem of selecting a representative sample from the group, a subject that is a discussion by itself.

Scientific method is usually characterized by

(1) Observation of random unrelated facts.

(2) Formulation of hypotheses tying together some of these facts (inductive reasoning).

(3) Validation of the hypotheses in order to establish a generalization (theory, law).

(4) Prediction of some occurrence or previously undiscovered relationship among facts on the basis of the established generalization (deductive reasoning).

(5) Testing the validity of the prediction by further experimentation.

Note: You should not misconstrue the summary of intellectual processes presented above as a formula which, if consciously followed in a machine-like fashion, will yield the answer to any problem. The list simply defines the usual thought processes which scientists use when they solve problems. This kind of artificial dissection of the thinking process is a pedagogical device to show more clearly how facts are woven into ideas. There is no pat "scientific method" which can be taught abstractly. Each problem requires its own series of thought processes that will provide the key to its solution. For example, when you are mulling over a problem in your mind, you sometimes come upon the answer in a sudden flash of insight and cry "I've got it!" In psychological jargon, this is called an "inference leap." It should be clear that no matter how much you discuss this term on an abstract level, you have no guarantee that the necessary integration of ideas will appear again when you attempt the solution of another problem. On the other hand, if you realize that your inference was really just the careful arrangement of facts into a pattern in your mind, and not a magical process that defies understanding, you will be more inclined to attack your next problem in a logical fashion.

Scientific method is a general term for logical thinking based on fact. It is not a specific list of processes to be followed mechanically.

 

 

Journal Evaluation and Abstract Write an abstract for one of the better quality articles that does not have an abstract already.

Pick 5 journals from the selections provided. Answer the following questions as well as you are able to.

Journal name

 

What is the frequency of publication?

 

 

 

 

 

Who publishes this journal?

 

 

 

 

 

Who is on the Board of Directors?

 

 

 

 

 

How do you get an article published in this journal?

 

 

 

 

 

What are the qualifications of the people who write for this journal?

 

 

 

 

 

What is the reputation of this journal?

 

 

 

 

 

How believable is the information in this journal? Why?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read one article from each journal and give a brief comparison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstract Journal Name________________________________________

Issue and page number ________________________________

 

Article title ___________________________________________

Author(s) ____________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Your academic advisor is available to help you with your academic planning and decision making. It is your responsibility to read the college catalog and choose the courses that will allow you to graduate within the time frame you have planned on. Remember that graduation is not automatic, and that you must apply to graduate.

Please find your academic advisor, look for their office hours, introduce yourself as an advisee, and ask them to sign this form. We hope you will return to take advantage of the knowledge and experience of your advisor.

 

SCI 100

This is to verify that

_______________________________________

( student's name )

 

has met _________________________________

( advisor's signature)

Date ___________

 

 

 

SCI 100 Lab Report Score Sheet

Name________________________ Number________

Title

1. Is the title informative, too brief, or too wordy?

2. Does the title have the appropriate key words for a literature search?

Introduction

3. Is there a clear statement of the problem being investigated?

4. Is there enough information to understand the question leading to the experiment?

5. Is the information appropriate for the problem being investigated?

6. Does the hypothesis provide a reasonable answer to the question?

7. Is the hypothesis quantitative?

Materials and Procedure

8. a. Could you repeat this experiment based on the information given?

b. If not, what is missing or confusing?

9. a. Is the experiment well designed?

b. If not, what are the problems?

10. Is there an adequate control?

11. Should the experiment be able to answer the question being investigated, completely or partially?

Results

12. Are the results presented in an appropriate fashion?

13. Are the results, as presented, properly labeled and easy to interpret?

14. Are the results complete?

15. Are the results observation, discussion, or conclusion?

Discussion

16. Does the discussion address all of the results, graphs included?

17. Does the discussion relate to all parts of the hypothesis?

18. a. Does the discussion repeat information already in the introduction?

b. Does the discussion use information in the introduction?

19. Is experimental error discussed in an appropriate manner?

20. Is the discussion logical in its order?

Conclusion

21. Does the conclusion answer the hypothesis?

22. Is the conclusion a logical consequence of the data?

23. Is the significance of the results discussed?

24. Were further studies suggested?

Bibliography

25. Is the bibliography appropriate?

26. Are the citations correctly done?

27. Are the facts obtained from references properly cited within the report?

Abstract

28. Does the abstract reflect the important topics in the report?

29. Would the abstract be useful in a literature search?

Overall

30. Is the report well organized, into recognizable sections?

31. What questions were not answered?

32. How could the experimental design have been improved?